Indigenous languages, Educational materials (Indigenous) » Haida texts and myths


25.09.10 by lidenskap

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Haida texts and myths - Skidegate dialect
Author: John Reed Swanton
Publisher: Smithsonian Institution Bureau of American Ethnolog
Publication date: 1905
ISBN: xxx
Number of pages: 460

Format / Quality: PDF / Google
Size: 30 MB

Quote:
SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION
BUREAU OF AMERICAN ETHNOLOGY: W.H. HOLMES, CHIEF
BULLETIN 29
HAIDA TEXTS AND MYTHS
SKIDEGATE DIALECT
RECORDED BY JOHN R. SWANTON
WASHINGTON
GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE
1905
[THE LIBRARY OF CONGRESS]
INTRODUCTION
The following texts and myths were obtained on the Queen Charlotte Islands, British Columbia, during the winter of 1900-01. They comprise all those procured at Skidegate, the more southern of the two towns on these islands still regularly occupied, which is made up of people from a number of towns that formerly existed along the eastern and western coasts, whose speech differed in certain particulars from that of the Haida on the northern coast. Since, however, all now live at Skidegate, their language is conveniently called the Skidegate dialect. For a similar reason the language of the northern Haida is called the Masset dialect, although it is spoken also in three Alaskan towns - Howkan, Klinkwan, and Kasaan. For study and comparison one text in each dialect has been given with interlinear translation, and twelve others with translations on the page opposite. Although the remaining stores were also obtained in Haida, English versions only are given, but they are kept as close to the original as possible.
I have tried to handle the translations in such a way as to assist the philologist without too far obscuring the meaning. Where obscure passages occur the notes will usually clear them up.
My interpreter was Henry Moody, who belongs to the principal family of Skedans, Those-born-at-Qa'gials, and has since become its chief.
For identifications of many of the plants and animals named in these stories I am indebted to Dr C. F. Newcombe, of Victoria, British Columbia.
CONTENTS
Introduction 5
Texts with free and interlinear translations 7
Moldy-forehead (Skidegate dialect)
Ildini (Masset dialect)
Stories accompanied by texts: 26
How Shining-heavens caused himself to be born
How Master-carpenter began making a canoe to war with Southwest
Canoe people who wear headdresses
Telin qa'-idjit
The girl who fed a raven
Sounding-gambling sticks
Tc!aawn'nk!
Story of the Food-giving town people
Story of Those-born-at-Skedans
Story told to accompany bear songs
Fight at the town of Da'x.ua
War between the West Coast Haida and the Tlingit
Myths in English 110
Raven travelling
A-slender-one-who-was-given-away
The one abandoned for eating the flipper of a hair seal
Sacred-one-standing-and-moving, Stone-ribs, and Upward
Supernatural-being-who-went-naked
He-who-was-born-from-this-mother's side
He-who-travels-behind-us (or Qona'ts)
He-who-got-supernatural-poer-from-his-little-finger
Laguardji'na or Lg.aña'ogaña
He who hunted birds in his father's village
The story of him whose sister brought him food from the land otters
How something pulled a row a eagles into the water
The story about him who destroyed his nine nephews
The story of one who saw an eagle town
The one they abandoned because he was the first to spear sea lions
The man who married a killer-whale woman
He who was abandoned by his uncles
The story of those who were abandoned at Stasqa'os
He who married the daughter of the devilfish chief
Those who were fasting to become shamans
Big-tail
The story of him through whom La'gna spoke
Cloud-wathcer
Story of the shaman, Ga'ndox's-father
Djila'quons
Story of the House-point families
How the Seaward-sqoa'ladas obtained the names of their gambling sticks
How one of the Stasa'os-la'nas became wealthy
Stories of the Pitch people
How a red feather pulled up some people in the town of Gunwa
Hos one was helped by a little wolf
Gunanasi'mgit
Story of the two towns who stood on opposite sides of Nass river
Slaughter-lover
The woman at Nass who fled from her husband
The rejected lover
He who gathered food for an eagle
Qo'lk!e
Two children's stories
A raid on the Tlingit
War between the West Coast and Ninstints haida and the Giti'sda
Raid by the Ninstints Haida and those of the West Coast
Fight between the Kaigani and West Coast Haida
Wars between the Stikine and Sitka Tlingit
Fights between the Town-of-Te!a'al-giti'ns and the Middle-giti'ns
Fights between the Tsimshian and Haida and among the northern Haida
War between the Eggs-of-Ski'tg-ao and the Inlet-rear-town people
Wars with the Niska and Tsimshian and conflicts between Haida families
Fight between Those-born-at Qa'gials and Those-born-at-Skedans
War between the Pebble-town people and the Slaves
War between the people of Kloo and the people of Ninstints
A fight between the Xa'gi-town people and Sand-town people
Wars betweent he people of Ninstints and the people of Skidegate
Wars between the peoples of Skidegate and Kloo
Wars between the towns of Kloo and Kitkatla and between the Kloo families
War between the people of Kloo and the Tsimshian
War between the people of Kloo and the Bellabella
War between the people of Kloo and the Giti'sda
Illustrations
Figure 1. Diagram of bear deadfall
Figure 2. Plan of large salmon trap
Figure 3. Drying frame for fish; horizontal and vertical plans
Figure 4. Traditional device used in the capture of the wa'sg.o
Figure 5. Diagram of marten deadfall


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